Four ways to earn credits this summer

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January 26, 2010

2:26 AM

Even though students are barely settled in for a new semester of classes, it is already time to start thinking ahead to summer plans, as deadlines are fast approaching. Whether you want to travel abroad, intern in Washington, D.C. or get ahead with coursework in Williamsburg, the College of William and Mary has options available.

According to the admissions office, over 50 percent of students study abroad during their time at the College, whether that means studying Renaissance architecture in Italy, or participating in an archeological dig in Barbados. With locations from Mexico to India, the range of classes and activities span almost every department. The programs vary in length and cost, however, scholarships are available with an additional application. Information sessions for the programs will be held this week. The information sessions are held in the Reeves Center. All applications, which require a letter of recommendation, an essay and a $75 registration fee are due next Monday. The registration fee is due to the Bursar’s office and the receipt should be turned in with the application. Detailed information about each trip is available at Studyabroad.wm.edu.

“We have a new schedule posted on the website for every day of the week,” Derick Arbough, student staff assistant at the Reeves Center, said. “We offer Summer Study 101 Sessions that will give an overview of how the system works. Students are encouraged to come to those first before meeting with a staff member.”

If you consider leaving the country as going too far for credits, the College offers an intensive six-to-seven-credit academic program called the D.C. Summer Institute. This year includes a Security Institute and a Business Institute. In addition to classes, participating students are guaranteed a nine-week internship in the district. This program is open to all students, even current seniors. There will be an information session tomorrow in Tidewater A and applications are due Friday at 5 p.m.

The Washington Summer Session is another program offered in D.C. where students can take GER courses in the College’s office near Dupont Circle. Students are able to register for this program online through Banner.

For students who cannot bring themselves to leave Williamsburg for the summer, the College offers two academic summer sessions. There are over 100 classes available during summer session. Each session lasts five weeks and classes meet daily.

“No PIN is required, so continuing students can just jump online and register,” Registrar’s Office employee Sallie Marchello said. “As always, students should talk with an advisor about the classes and how they’ll fit into the overall curriculum, but advising is not mandatory for summer.”

Students can live on campus and possibly can qualify for free housing through paid research internships with faculty members. Registration for summer courses has not begun, but students can look up classes on Banner. Marchello recommended becoming a fan of WM Registrar on Facebook to stay updated on new information and announcements.

If summer is your time to take a break from classes, the Career Center is a great resource for finding a productive way to gain work experience during the break. The Spring 2010 Career and Internship Fair is Friday from 12 to 4 p.m. in the Sadler Center. No registration is required and students of every academic year are welcome. In order to be eligible for on-campus interviews, which begin next month, seniors must have their resume approved by the Career Center, go to an interviewing workshop and participate in a mock interview scheduled through the Career Center. The first on-campus interviewing deadline is next Monday. The online database for internships and jobs is always available to students, and while postings are currently sparse, more employment opportunities will be published on the website as summer approaches.

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