Board of Visitors covers campus renovations

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February 3, 2011

10:37 PM

The College of William and Mary’s Board of Visitors Committee on Buildings and Grounds met Thursday morning to discuss the future of campus housing and academic buildings.

The committee reviewed their work since the last meeting with the rest of the Board. The committee consists of Janet Brashear ’82, Charles Banks, Colin Campbell, Laura Flippin ’92, Clifford Schroeder, Michael Tang ’76, and Vice President for Administration Anna Martin.

The committee went over their plan for expanding the Virginia Institute of Marine Science as well as their “6-year-plan” for remodeling and rebuilding the College’s campus.

A large part of the meeting was spent discussing the prospect of new fraternity housing.

The committee is currently performing a fraternity housing study, which will determine where on their list of priorities a new fraternity housing complex will go, and where the complex itself should go.

The plan proposed would build a housing complex for 200 Greek residents, and the units would be renovated and used as freshman housing.

However, a new fraternity housing complex is still at the drawing board.

“One of my concerns is that before we think about adding new beds, the fact that we have a significant amount of renovation that needs to take place in the facilities we have in residence halls and that number is almost $100,000,000,” Martin said.

Included in the committee’s plan for the upcoming years are the remodeling of Tucker Hall and Tyler Hall, building the third phase of the Integrated Science Center, and remodeling the Brafferton.

At the bottom of their list of priorities is the renovation of residence halls.

“Housing is becoming a more and more pressing issue, especially with the pressure of admitting 150 new students,” Brashear said. “We may find that it gets worse before it gets better.”

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