Coming to a theater near you!

Women’s golf: Liu leads Tribe to third at CAA Championships

Written by

|

April 19, 2016

12:03 AM

William and Mary finished its season this weekend in third place in team standings with a 74-over 938 at the three-day Colonial Athletic Association Championships at St. James Plantation in Southport, N.C. The Tribe had its first silver medalist in senior Alessandra Liu, who took second with a four-over 220.

After Friday’s opening round, the College held third place at 313 (+25), and North Carolina-Wilmington, the pre-tournament favorite, led the pack at 307 (+19). Liu held third place after one round at four-over 76. The other four members of the Tribe held spots in the top 25. Following Liu, freshman Elizabeth Choi and sophomore Katie Edelblut sat tied with each other at eighth at 78 (+6). Senior Tina Chang held 17th with a nine-over 81, while junior Mia Zanghetti rounded out the team in 21st with a 10-over 82. UNC-Wilmington’s Meghan Theiss led the field at one-under 71 entering the second round.

Saturday morning set the College back to fifth place in the field of eight, holding a 53-over 629, just eight strokes behind new leader Delaware. Liu improved her standing to a tie for the lead after shooting par for round two for a two-day total of 148 (+4). Theiss fell out of the top five, the tie with Liu coming from the Blue Hens’ Andrea Slane. Edelblut dropped to 13th at 160 (+16), Zanghetti moved up to 18th one stroke behind at 161 (+17), while Choi sat at 25th at 163 (+19) and Chang was in 27th at 164 (+20).

Liu set the College’s program record for highest finish in the CAA Championships and broke the record for best score in the event by six strokes.

The final round Sunday proved the deciding factor for the tournament, the College making history through Liu’s third round performance. She shot par again to finish in second place at 220 (+4), Slane taking the gold medal by just two strokes. Liu set the College’s program record for highest finish in the CAA Championships and broke the record for best score in the event by six strokes. Barring a postseason berth, she finishes her career as one of the most decorated golfers in Tribe history.

Zanghetti moved up to ninth with a 20-over 236, followed by Edelblut with a 25-over 241 in 17th, Choi in 24th at 244 (+28), and Chang in 31st at 250 (+34). The final round moved the College back to third at 938 (+74), 11 strokes behind CAA Champion Delaware and three strokes behind runner-up Charleston.

This wraps up the College’s season, unless the team receives an at-large bid in the April 25 NCAA selection announcement for the national championship tournament, which takes place May 5-7.

Share This Article

Related News

Commentary: In support of student-athletes’ national anthem protest
Commentary: Calling out Cluley’s flaws
Field Hockey: Tribe falls 3-2 at home to Liberty

About Author

Nick Cipolla

Sports Editor Nick Cipolla '17 is a neuroscience major from Virginia Beach, Va. He was previously Associate Sports Editor.

  • Brandon Beejay

    Golf. Really N-Dog? This is what you’re bringing me to work with tonight? I thought you were the “Senior Sports Editor”, not the “Senior Hobbies and Pastimes Editor”. You may as well be writing an article on bowling or scrabble. I mean, I’m sitting here eating mint oreos and picking the lint out of my asshole (not at the same time, that would be vulgar), and I open my laptop to see another article by our own Kcin Allopic. Imagine my excitement and enthusiasm as I quickly follow the link, my mind already racing with potential nonsense to spam your journalism with. And now, imagine my disappointment to find out your article focuses on “women’s golf”. I threw up in my mouth reading that. So instead of talking about the G word, we should find something else to discuss. Here, let me show you a magic trick. Take your age. Now add thirty five. Divide that by seven and round down to the nearest whole number. Now multiply that by two. Subtract the number which corresponds with your month of birth (for example, April=4). Next, add the number of letters in your first name. Multiply by two again. Subtract five. Divide by eight, and then finally multiply by four. Okay, so now round that number to the nearest whole number. This next part is really important; if you’re OLDER than fifteen, SUBTRACT six. If you’re YOUNGER than fifteen, ADD six. Ready for the big reveal? Your number is… unique to you, you dipshit, how the fuck could I predict something like that without knowing anything about you? Goddamn. I hope you did all that math expecting a serious response. You nerd.

    I’m having some trouble and I was hoping you could help me out. It’s sort of embarrassing, but who is “Waka Flocka Flame”? No one ever told me and at this point I’m too embarrassed to ask my friends in person; they’re still making fun of me because I didn’t know Juicy J and JZ were the same person. Pls respond.

    That is no country for old men. The young
    In one another’s arms, birds in the trees
    —Those dying generations—at their song,
    The salmon-falls, the mackerel-crowded seas,
    Fish, flesh, or fowl, commend all summer long
    Whatever is begotten, born, and dies.
    Caught in that sensual music all neglect
    Monuments of unageing intellect.
    An aged man is but a paltry thing,
    A tattered coat upon a stick, unless
    Soul clap its hands and sing, and louder sing
    For every tatter in its mortal dress,
    Nor is there singing school but studying
    Monuments of its own magnificence;
    And therefore I have sailed the seas and come
    To the holy city of Byzantium.
    O sages standing in God’s holy fire
    As in the gold mosaic of a wall,
    Come from the holy fire, perne in a gyre,
    And be the singing-masters of my soul.
    Consume my heart away; sick with desire
    And fastened to a dying animal
    It knows not what it is; and gather me
    Into the artifice of eternity.
    Once out of nature I shall never take
    My bodily form from any natural thing,
    But such a form as Grecian goldsmiths make
    Of hammered gold and gold enamelling
    To keep a drowsy Emperor awake;
    Or set upon a golden bough to sing
    To lords and ladies of Byzantium
    Of what is past, or passing, or to come.

    That was “Sailing to Byzantium” by Yeats. It’s one of my favorite poems. Basically, the speaker is lamenting the agony of old age, and the struggle of maintaining creative imagination in a body which is falling apart. The only solution the speaker can propose is to travel to Byzantium (in the time of the empire, no mater how you were traveling to Byzantium, you said you were “sailing”), where works of art live on eternally. The speaker longs to be transformed into a work of art, so that he might harness and exude personal creativity for all time, long after his body has turned to dust. In this existence, time loses its meaning. Past, present, and future all exist as a single entity, overlapping and blending together in a beautiful realm of glory.

    Sometimes when I feel lost I come back to this poem. It’s worth thinking about; when you’re afraid or feeling broken. One day we’ll all be gone, time doesn’t discriminate. But life and death are both part of the same work of art. There’s good art and bad art. Which will you let your life be?