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Staff Editorial: More news to peruse

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September 4, 2007

10:29 AM

At many universities across the country, students enjoy ready access to a variety of newspapers and sources of information that enhance their knowledge of current events and foreign and domestic affairs. Known as Collegiate Readership Programs, various newspapers are widely available daily to college students at significant discounts. These programs are currently in effect at Stanford University, Columbia University, Penn State and Texas A&M and are being considered by other schools. While we are proud of our institution, we cannot help but wonder why the College does not make more of an effort to provide us with the means to be better informed citizens and students by implementing such a practical program.

p. The addition of quality national newspapers, such as The New York Times and The Washington Post, placed strategically in high-traffic areas, such as the University Center lobby, would have a significant effect on keeping the student body well informed. Students could grab a copy on their way to class or lunch and be able to read up quickly on important developments at home and worldwide.

p. Some may argue that since Swem Library supplies daily copies and free online access to various publications, the school is already providing this service. However, this is not entirely the case, as the average student does not have the luxury of an hour of free time each day to trek to Swem to read newspapers. In addition, print newspapers have a portable quality that online versions can’t match.

p. As the College’s student newspaper, we have a vested interest in assuring that students, faculty and staff are well informed on a variety of topics. Many professors currently recommend — if not require — students to consume news on a daily basis to compliment their academic work. Considering the benefits to students, we think it would be a timely and appropriate decision for the Student Assembly to consider such a program and present it to students in a referendum. Implementation of a Collegiate Readership Program would have low costs for students and the administration and immeasurably high rewards for all.

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