Student robbed at gunpoint

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January 24, 2011

1:38 PM

A College of William and Mary student was the victim of an armed robbery in the early hours of Monday morning, authorities said.

In an e-mail sent at 12 p.m. to students, Vice President for Student Affairs Ginger Ambler ’88 Ph.d. ’06 said that a student was held at gunpoint at approximately 1 a.m. on the 700 block of Richmond Rd.

According to Williamsburg Police, the student was walking along Richmond Road and was approached by two men riding bicycles. The two men confronted the student with a firearm and took cash from the student’s wallet before fleeing the scene. The student was able to make it home and notified police of the incident.

“Thankfully, the student was not physically injured in the incident,” Ambler said. “Staff members in the Dean of Students Office are reaching out to the student involved to provide him with additional support and resources.”

Williamsburg police described the suspects as tall males, approximately 6′ to 6’2″ in height, weighing between 220 and 250 lbs., speaking with deep voices with southern accents and wearing dark clothing and hooded sweatshirts. The race of the two suspects is unknown.

Ambler said that, while such occurrences are rare in Williamsburg, members of the College community should remain vigilant.

“What happened early this morning, however, is an unfortunate reminder that even in a community as special as ours, crimes can and do occur,” Ambler said. “There may be nothing we can do to fully insulate ourselves from the reality of crime in our world. At the same time, this is a good time to remember that there are measures we can and should take to increase our level of personal safety.”

Anyone with information on the suspects is encouraged to contact Williamsburg Police or the Crime Line at 1-888-LOCK-U-UP

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